Signs of a Healthy Bearded Dragon

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  1. Look for a larger, plump, alert Bearded Dragon. Don’t buy a Bearded Dragon unless it is at least 6 weeks old and at least 6 inches in length. Younger Bearded Dragon babies are very cute, but they have a greater chance of becoming ill or dying. They can also suddenly stop eating and may have to be force fed.
  2. Look closely at the Bearded Dragon’s limbs, tail, and toes to make sure they are not swollen or broken. Broken bones may be a sign of metabolic bone disease. Also, limbs and toes that twitch or tremble are a sign of metabolic bone disease.
  3. Make sure the Bearded Dragon is active and alert and is eating regularly on a proper diet.
  4. Make sure it has clear and bright eyes that are NOT sunken in. Sunken eyes are a sign of dehydration, and the animal may be near death.
  5. Look for fullness in the limbs and tail especially in the base. Make sure you cannot see the tail or hip bones. Lizards store fat in their tails.
  6. They should have healthy clean skin with no lesions.
  7. Watch the bearded dragon run around and make sure he/she is using all of the limbs and not limping or stumbling. Look for any deformities. A missing toes and tips of the tails is not a big deal if it has healed properly. These injuries usually happen from nips from cage mates or improper shedding.
  8. Look at the enclosure the bearded dragon has been kept in to make sure it is clean and the food is fresh. Make sure the bearded dragon has gotten proper expose to UVB light and has been given calcium supplements. Ask questions about how the bearded dragon and the cared it received. 
  9. DO NOT purchase a Bearded Dragon if it is skinny, listless, or the eyes are sunken in.
  10. When you bring a new bearded dragon home it is normal for him/her to be nervous and timid for the first few days. He/she may not eat well for the 2-3 days. They usually warm up to you quickly though and get used to getting handled. Do not purchase an aggressive bearded dragon who bites or puffs up or always has a black beard.
    10 Signs of a Healthy Bearded Dragon

    10 Signs of a Healthy Bearded Dragon

     

    Example of healthy beardies:
    http://dragonrancher.com/available/

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Prospects

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I’m considering breeding bearded dragons again in a few months and would like to get people’s opinions. Should I breed Female 1 or Female 2? If I do breed them, I would likely have babies available in the fall. Pick up would be available in the Marlboro, MA area. Who might be interested?

Thanks in advance!

 

Female 1: Red Hypo Tiger

Female 2: Rainbow Tiger Small breed

She is only about 16 inches long, 300 grams, has beautiful coloring, has a great temperament, doesn’t eat or defecate as much as a normal size beardie, and makes a great pet!

Both females

Male: Rainbow Tiger {Red Hypo x Citrus Tiger}

Male as a juvenile:

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*Female Bearded Dragon FOUND a New Home*

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This healthy female bearded dragon is in need of a new home. She hatched in the summer of 2008 and is missing 2 toes from a bite from a sibling as a baby. She is a great eater, gets along with other females (although she should be fed separately to ensure every beardie gets enough to eat), and is easy to handle. She has been around children and would make a great pet for a someone knowledgeable about bearded dragons. She is located in Massachusetts. Please contact me if you’re interested. Thank you.

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My Female Beardies

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R.I.P. Marvin

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R.I.P. Marvin.  You had a great 12 years.

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Bearded Dragon – Found a new home!

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A young bearded dragon located in Chelmsford, Massachusetts is in need of a new home. He is 16 inches long, healthy, and tame. He may be adopted for a small re-homing fee for him alone or with his enclosure and accessories for an additional fee or best offer. For more information, please go to:  http://boston.craigslist.org/gbs/pet/5487266021.html

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Snuggle

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Hypo vs. Het Hypo

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HYPO (Hypomelanistic or hypomelanism)

Hypo bearded dragons are the offspring of two hypomelanism parents. “Hypo” means less, and melanism refers to the pigment in skin. Hypo bearded dragons have reduced melanin resulting in less brown/black coloring with 100% clear nails and a lighter appearance.

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Hypo Red Tiger Female

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HET HYPO (Heterozygous for Hypo)

Het Hypos carry the hypo gene but do not show it. They have dark nails and darker pigment similar to normal bearded dragons; however, tend to show color better and are lighter when compared to a normal bearded dragon. Breeding a het hypo with a 100% hypo should produce in approximately 50% hypos and 50% het hypos.  I’m hoping to mate the above hypo female with the below het hypo male in late 2016 and am looking forward to the results!

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Het Hypo “Rainbow Tiger” (Red Hypo x Citrus tiger) Male

 

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Red Hypo Tiger

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She is a red hypo tiger, and I’m hoping to breed her late 2016. 3214

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Available Bearded Dragon*** Found a home

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Male citrus tiger Bearded Dragon needs a new home. He is about three years old, healthy, and tame. He comes with a 46 gallon bow front aquarium with storage stand, 10.0 UVB light, heat light, lamps, bowl, and accessories.

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Must pick up in Northboro, MA. The tank stand most likely will not fit in a car.  If interested, email HelpForYourPet@gmail.com

 

 

 

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